Jump to content


Photo

Your opinion on macs

Mac computer Apple

  • Please log in to reply
33 replies to this topic

#1 Edgest

Edgest

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 693 posts

Posted 05 July 2015 - 10:30 PM

I am thinking about buying a Mac and am wondering:

What is the best model to buy for someone who will use it mostly just for programming?
Would you go with a refurbished model to save money?
What are your thoughts about macs?
What is the life expectancy of a Mac?
Edgest 17'4 is the most current update to the original Edgest

Edgest City 1'2 Is the most current update for the new Edgest

#2 Bnm

Bnm

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1323 posts

Posted 05 July 2015 - 11:17 PM

Macs are great
  • Direct City - Brice likes this

#3 Jason

Jason

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 06 July 2015 - 12:33 AM

That's going to depend on your needs. Programming itself doesn't require a powerful computer, but if you want to create applications that do require a powerful computer you'll need one to test them with. So you have to figure out the kinds of applications you're aiming to make. 

 

My thoughts about Macs and life expectancy:

 

OS X is an extremely well-optimized operating system and has far less of a toll on the hardware than Windows does (not speaking for Windows 10, since I know very little about it. But certainly true of 8 and under). For this reason, Macs will have very good battery life and will last a long time. My current Mac here is two years old and runs about as good as if I just bought it. 

 

OS X does everything Windows can do. And in my opinion, it does many of those things in a much more elegant way. 

 

If you're looking for gaming, Macs come with class 2 GPUs at best. Certainly not the 'best' GPUs out there, but they can run games perfectly fine. And OS X El Capitan is introducing the Metal rendering API to OS X, which will allow much better performing games than was possible with OpenGL.

 

Would I personally go for a refurbished model to save money? No, I'd get the latest and greatest. But that's because I make applications that require a lot of performance out of the computer. Your needs may be different.


  • mrob27 and RowdyPants like this

#4 Dblcut3

Dblcut3

    Super Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1763 posts
  • LocationUnited States Of America

Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:02 AM

I have a Macbook Air and its great. I understand that Macs aren't made for gaming, but if you still enjoy some gaming on the side, you'll need a pretty powerful Mac.



#5 Edgest

Edgest

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 693 posts

Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:40 AM

I have a Macbook Air and its great. I understand that Macs aren't made for gaming, but if you still enjoy some gaming on the side, you'll need a pretty powerful Mac.


What do you typically use your Mac for?
Edgest 17'4 is the most current update to the original Edgest

Edgest City 1'2 Is the most current update for the new Edgest

#6 Edgest

Edgest

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 693 posts

Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:42 AM

That's going to depend on your needs. Programming itself doesn't require a powerful computer, but if you want to create applications that do require a powerful computer you'll need one to test them with. So you have to figure out the kinds of applications you're aiming to make. 
 
My thoughts about Macs and life expectancy:
 
OS X is an extremely well-optimized operating system and has far less of a toll on the hardware than Windows does (not speaking for Windows 10, since I know very little about it. But certainly true of 8 and under). For this reason, Macs will have very good battery life and will last a long time. My current Mac here is two years old and runs about as good as if I just bought it. 
 
OS X does everything Windows can do. And in my opinion, it does many of those things in a much more elegant way. 
 
If you're looking for gaming, Macs come with class 2 GPUs at best. Certainly not the 'best' GPUs out there, but they can run games perfectly fine. And OS X El Capitan is introducing the Metal rendering API to OS X, which will allow much better performing games than was possible with OpenGL.
 
Would I personally go for a refurbished model to save money? No, I'd get the latest and greatest. But that's because I make applications that require a lot of performance out of the computer. Your needs may be different.


Have you heard anything from people that have bought refurbished models?

Which Mac do you have?
Edgest 17'4 is the most current update to the original Edgest

Edgest City 1'2 Is the most current update for the new Edgest

#7 Jason

Jason

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 06 July 2015 - 09:32 AM

No, I don't know anything about refurbished.

I use a late 2013 retina MacBook Pro with 16 gigs of RAM and 256 gigs of storage (and after my year and a half of use, 75% of that is still free), quad core i7, etc.

#8 danol

danol

    danol

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 722 posts
  • LocationGermany

Posted 06 July 2015 - 04:38 PM

I have my MacBook Air 13'' 4Gb RAM, i5 and 128GB of Flash Storage and I love it. But next time I will buy me one with more storage and more RAM XD and maybe an better processor.

 

If you want a PC/Mac for Gaming you are better with a Windows PC but if you want to work on it as developer or some creativity stuff like video or photo editing it's the best you can buy

 

e.g. I bought it for school and and programming and for the stuff I currently program it's enough. I guess you will just need a powerful mac if you want to program games or really really huge programs.

 

It's just so great for programmers because this allows to compile for iOS, OSX, Windows and Linux and not just Windows and Linux if you have a Windows PC. So at this point it depends on the language(s) you program with and on which Operating System you want to publish your Apps/Programs.


  • Dblcut3 likes this

Bye.

 

The small things are the things who change the world.

 

- Facebook(Direct City): https://www.facebook.com/edendirectcity

- Facebook(Eden Elite):https://www.facebook.com/Elite.Of.Eden

- German Eden fanpage: https://www.facebook.com/EdenWorldBuilderGerman

- Tumblr: http://david-nolte.tumblr.com 

 

 


#9 Jason

Jason

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 06 July 2015 - 09:43 PM

Once Apple releases Metal to OS X, the gap between Windows and Mac gaming is going to be far, far smaller. 



#10 danol

danol

    danol

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 722 posts
  • LocationGermany

Posted 06 July 2015 - 11:29 PM

Once Apple releases Metal to OS X, the gap between Windows and Mac gaming is going to be far, far smaller. 

Yes definitely. But I guess to be able to play really cool games you will need minimum a i7 cpu even if it uses Metal.

 

Btw. Jason I'm new to iOS programming and I'm searching for the best way to save data currently I'm getting a closer look into core data and that seems pretty useful but I'm curious if there is might be a better way :D 


Bye.

 

The small things are the things who change the world.

 

- Facebook(Direct City): https://www.facebook.com/edendirectcity

- Facebook(Eden Elite):https://www.facebook.com/Elite.Of.Eden

- German Eden fanpage: https://www.facebook.com/EdenWorldBuilderGerman

- Tumblr: http://david-nolte.tumblr.com 

 

 


#11 Jason

Jason

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 07 July 2015 - 07:20 AM

Well, that's going to depend on your saving needs. For example, how much data do you need to save?



#12 mrob27

mrob27

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 451 posts
  • LocationUSA

Posted 07 July 2015 - 07:41 AM

I use my Macs so long they almost count as "refurbished". The newest one I have is more than 4 years old now. I've also bought refurbished Macs from Apple and they're great.

 

Edgest is thinking of getting a Mac for programming. I guess that means Mac programming and/or iOS programming, because otherwise why bother getting a mac? And probably you want to share your creation with others, and since you have to run the latest Mac OS to do iOS programming, and because most people with Macs update their OS, you're going to want a Mac that will run the latest version (Yosemite) and future versions of Mac OS X fairly well.

 

Anything Apple sells as "refurbished" (link: http://store.apple.c...pecialdeals/mac ) will come with the current Mac OS installed (or if not, Yosemite upgrade is free) and should serve you well for 2-3 years at least. Yosemite runs on everything Apple has shipped since 2009! (see https://www.apple.co...how-to-upgrade/ ) They're just as reliable and have the same warranty as if you bought a current model. You're just paying a bit less to get last year's product.

 

I agree with the comments from others, like Jason's comments about GPUs


  • Jason likes this

In the App Store, the 4th sample screen shot is from my world: Tokyo Unified Amuro'44121191'53 (compare)

x0N0ygg.png

The official version has the date 10/11/2015. Accept no substitutes™  ^_^  (I also figured out the file format)


#13 Jason

Jason

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 07 July 2015 - 08:03 AM

I would recommend going for El Capitan over Yosemite, though. All those under the hood optimizations will help the Mac last longer :).



#14 ansin11

ansin11

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 256 posts
  • LocationGermany

Posted 07 July 2015 - 06:28 PM

Yes definitely. But I guess to be able to play really cool games you will need minimum a i7 cpu even if it uses Metal.
 
[...]


I don't know much about Macs, but what i do know is that they wont fit a gamer's needs; not all games are ported to the OS X platform and laptop graphics cards are generally not made for gaming; the latest MacBook Pro has a R9 M370X, just comparing it's stream processing units (thats the stuff that renders the frames step by step) with a basic R9 270X will end up with the 270X having twice the amount of SPUs, while the M370X is actually newer.
The maximum in terms of CPU that MacBooks offer is 4x2.8GHz, this isnt exactly much (not what one needs for gaming) but clearly enough for coding and programming.

I am thinking about buying a Mac and am wondering:
What is the best model to buy for someone who will use it mostly just for programming?
Would you go with a refurbished model to save money?
What are your thoughts about macs?
What is the life expectancy of a Mac?



As i don't know a lot about Macs but kinda more about PS specs, i recommend (for programming only) to go for at least 2.2GHz (this is actually a wild guess, i don't know how much OS X really needs, im used to Windows 8.1 which takes what it can grab) and 6+GB RAM.
Don't be too focused on the GPU, as i figured before, they don't suit a gamer's needs and gamers are the only ones who care about their graphics card anyways :). The internet says that the maximum storage is 1TB, but this will be very expensive, I would go for 128GB or maybe 256GB and then get an external HDD for data.
I personally would not go for a refurbished model, but thats really a personal preference, I wouldnt feel safe with one; but it's up to you and how much youre wanting to spend.
Based on what i read here and across my quick google searches about Mac specs they seem to be just what one needs for programming (testing is a whole new dimension tho lol), as long as you just want it for your coding or maybe some generic everyday-stuff such as school, films or music, it seems like a good idea.

#15 Jason

Jason

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 07 July 2015 - 07:54 PM

I don't play extremely high quality graphics games on my Mac. I play Minecraft. And the AMPLIFIED world type runs beautifully on my 2 year old Mac with very little latency. Minecraft may not have high quality graphics, but the amount of work your computer has to perform to generate its worlds (3D noise calculations), do lightning calculations, do block ticks, and store so many blocks in the world at once (high view range) is really high. I can play with 20+ view range without any latency as well.

 

So there's that, at least.

 

PS: I'll have you know my Mac has an integrated GPU, not even a dedicated graphics chip. Intel Iris Pro. And it still runs fine. 

 

So I think you shouldn't worry too much, even if you like games. 

 

Seriously, the only single one thing Windows wins with is gaming. And hardly. Nothing else. If you're a gamer who wants to play the most insane graphics games out there, get a Windows gaming computer. If you're not, then for literally everything else, Mac is going to be better. (Well, unless you want a touch screen computer. Then Windows is the only choice!)



#16 ansin11

ansin11

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 256 posts
  • LocationGermany

Posted 07 July 2015 - 08:08 PM

Indeed Jason. For gaming, Windows is what you want, especially if youre like me and built a custom gaming PC as OS X is exclusively for prebuilt machines :)

#17 danol

danol

    danol

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 722 posts
  • LocationGermany

Posted 07 July 2015 - 08:42 PM

Well, that's going to depend on your saving needs. For example, how much data do you need to save?

not a lot. It will not be a huge contact database or something.

So what do you suggest for a lot of data and what do you would suggest for not that much of data?


Bye.

 

The small things are the things who change the world.

 

- Facebook(Direct City): https://www.facebook.com/edendirectcity

- Facebook(Eden Elite):https://www.facebook.com/Elite.Of.Eden

- German Eden fanpage: https://www.facebook.com/EdenWorldBuilderGerman

- Tumblr: http://david-nolte.tumblr.com 

 

 


#18 Jason

Jason

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 07 July 2015 - 08:51 PM

Core data is great for saving a whole lot of data. 

 

For smaller amounts of data, you can use NSCoding. NSCoding is nice because of how easy it is to implement it, if the data requirements aren't very high. 

 

You can read this article for some information, if you're using Objective-C. If you're using Swift it's not too difficult to translate, or you can find other resources. (I personally use Swift). 

Click here

 

It follows from previous articles, which you can also look at. But you shouldn't need to.



#19 danol

danol

    danol

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 722 posts
  • LocationGermany

Posted 07 July 2015 - 09:08 PM

Core data is great for saving a whole lot of data. 

 

For smaller amounts of data, you can use NSCoding. NSCoding is nice because of how easy it is to implement it, if the data requirements aren't very high. 

 

You can read this article for some information, if you're using Objective-C. If you're using Swift it's not too difficult to translate, or you can find other resources. (I personally use Swift). 

Click here

 

It follows from previous articles, which you can also look at. But you shouldn't need to.

Ok thx I guess I will start with core data to be prepared if I need to save later more data :D

And yeah I'm using Swift.


Bye.

 

The small things are the things who change the world.

 

- Facebook(Direct City): https://www.facebook.com/edendirectcity

- Facebook(Eden Elite):https://www.facebook.com/Elite.Of.Eden

- German Eden fanpage: https://www.facebook.com/EdenWorldBuilderGerman

- Tumblr: http://david-nolte.tumblr.com 

 

 


#20 Jason

Jason

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1337 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 07 July 2015 - 10:05 PM

I'd learn both. Both have their uses.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Mac, computer, Apple

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users